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2016 Sustainability Report
published 2017/08/01

Microplastics in the oceans

By 2050 there will be more plastic than fish in the world’s oceans if we carry on like this. We all share responsibility for the situation. And we are all responsible for finding solutions.

More plastic than fish

Experts estimate that up to 12 million tons of plastic garbage is landing in our oceans every year. And even though our "western" industrialized world is clearly producing too much plastic, at least most European and American industrialized countries have reasonably functional waste disposal systems.


In Asia, on the other hand, infrastructure for collecting plastic and recycling it appropriately – if only as fuel for the production of electricity or heat – is often fully lacking.


Source: Jambeck, J.R. et al: Plastic waste inputs from land into the ocean, Science, (347), p.769 (Englisch)


Plastic Waste

Source: http://staging.unep.org/docs/MarineLitter.pdf

 
 

Because our main production countries are in Asia, we are also responsible and have to do our part to help solve the problem. We are working to raise awareness among our suppliers for the issue and we want to support our partner, the WWF Germany, in building a network of waste management systems in the Mekong Delta.


Microplastics - miniature particles do maximum harm to the environment

In addition to the larger pieces of plastic waste entering the waterways and decomposing there very slowly, we as an outdoor brand have a particular problem: tiny fiber particles that are shed from our products and are too small for normal filtering in sewage treatment plants are entering the oceans as microplastics


Because our products are usually made of synthetic fibers such as polyamide or polyester, we are unintentionally contributing to pollution in the oceans as well. 

 
What makes microplastics so tragic is that not only are they extremely durable and take hundreds of years to decompose, they also don’t generally float at the top of the ocean but rather somewhere between the surface and the sea floor. Marine animals mistake them for food and end up starving with their stomachs full of plastic. As a part of the food chain, these plastics accumulate in larger animals and also end up in the food we eat.


Spitze des Eisbergs: Das meiste Plastik treibt unter der Wasseroberfläche.

Source: http://staging.unep.org/docs/MarineLitter.pdf

 
 

Tackling the problem at its roots

Of course, we are concerned that our products are polluting the environment with microparticles. We want to tackle the problem at its roots: in the materials that we use. Either these products shouldn’t shed any microfibers at all, or they should be biodegradable. Or both ... with full functionality of course. We have already found some promising initial approaches that we're testing.


At the same time, we are currently planning a large joint research project in which we want to work with other companies, conservation and industry associations and universities to identify the materials, conditions, and amounts of microfiber shedding that the problem involves, as well as if and how we can prevent it and what materials could be used as alternatives.


GRI:   G4-DMA Materials
Report why the Aspect is material. Report the impacts that make this Aspect material. Report how the organization manages the material Aspect or its impacts. Report the evaluation of the management approach, including: The mechanisms for evaluating the efectiveness of the management approach The results of the evaluation of the management approach Any related adjustments to the management approach
GRI:   G4-DMA Waste and Wastewater
Report why the Aspect is material. Report the impacts that make this Aspect material. Report how the organization manages the material Aspect or its impacts. Report the evaluation of the management approach, including: The mechanisms for evaluating the efectiveness of the management approach The results of the evaluation of the management approach Any related adjustments to the management approach
GRI:   G4-EN27
Extent of impact mitigation of environmental impacts of products and services
GRI:   G4-EN23
Total weight of waste by type and disposal method
Links
Unsere Ozeane versinken im Plastikmüll (WWF, German)
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The new plastics economy: Rethinking the future of plastics (Ellen Macarthur Foundation):
Read more
Textiles and tyres a major source of ocean pollution
Read more
Marine Directive of European Comission
Read more
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